Category: art

Art News Roundup: Seen in Savannah Edition

You’ll forgive me, gentle reader, for not posting one of my longer articles on Tuesday. I recently returned from a short break in Savannah, where I visited the Telfair Museums in order to review their current exhibition on “Rembrandt and the Jewish Experience”, examining how the Jewish community in Amsterdam influenced the art of this Christian Old Master. My musings on the show are … Read More Art News Roundup: Seen in Savannah Edition

Art News Roundup: Teaser Trailer Edition

As you may have seen on social media yesterday, my colleagues at The Federalist very kindly asked permission to reprint Tuesday’s blog post, in which I reflected on the devastating fire at Notre-Dame de Paris. It was a rather difficult piece to write, and involved several hours of initial scribbling in one frame of mind, a phone call to an old friend who helped … Read More Art News Roundup: Teaser Trailer Edition

Resurgam

The 20th century Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier’s most famous aphorism, “Une maison est une machine-à-habiter,” is usually translated as, “A house is a machine for living in.” When it functions properly, a house can shelter us from storms, keep wild animals at bay, and give us a place to store our stuff. It may be more or less comfortable, depending on our circumstances, but … Read More Resurgam

Art News Roundup: Las Vegas Lifeguard Edition

For decades now, Las Vegas hoteliers have been caught between two competing impulses when it comes to building and furnishing their resorts. Some have made an effort to distinguish their establishments from the more tawdry, gimmicky aspects of the city’s past, by erecting modern, luxurious structures and filling them with fine art. You’ll recall in the George Clooney version of “Ocean’s Eleven” that Andy … Read More Art News Roundup: Las Vegas Lifeguard Edition

The Imagined East: An Unexpected Revival

While much of the art world and the art market continues to be endlessly enthralled by the excretions of Contemporary Art, which for the most part say nothing new and display little actual “art” in their execution, a forgotten corner of art history has slowly been gaining in popularity among both collectors and the public. The reemergence of interest in “Orientalism”, which I’ve written … Read More The Imagined East: An Unexpected Revival

Art News Roundup: Luxuriant Beard Edition

When it comes to learning about art, it’s difficult to attempt something approaching comprehensive autodidactism. As professional art researcher Eric Turquin pointed out in a recent interview with the Art Newspaper, discussing his career and the hotly-debated “Judith and Holofernes” alleged to be a lost work by Caravaggio (1571-1610), being an art generalist simply isn’t possible anymore. “If you want to succeed,” he notes, … Read More Art News Roundup: Luxuriant Beard Edition

From The Federalist: Tintoretto at the National Gallery

My latest bit of art criticism for The Federalist is out this morning. This time, I’m reviewing the National Gallery of Art’s major new exhibition on the work of the Venetian Renaissance master Tintoretto (1518-1594). I should say exhibitions, plural, because in addition to the main show looking at his development and breadth of output as a painter, there are additional exhibitions at the museum … Read More From The Federalist: Tintoretto at the National Gallery

Art News Roundup: Slings and Arrows Edition

Sometimes when I’m tapping out a blog post or a magazine article, I wonder what the point of it all is. Case in point, when I visited the opening of “Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice” at the National Gallery this past Sunday I was sitting, completely enthralled, across from his “Madonna of the Treasurers”, when a group of older tourists sauntered by, commenting on … Read More Art News Roundup: Slings and Arrows Edition

In Bloom: Three Paintings for Spring

Although it’s still slightly chilly in the Nation’s Capital, Spring has (finally) sprung here at last: our famous cheery trees are blooming, daffodils are taking over hillsides and traffic medians, and tulip leaves are inching toward the point beyond which their flowers will appear. In the Spring, with apologies to Lord Tennyson, both a young man and a somewhat older man’s fancy may lightly … Read More In Bloom: Three Paintings for Spring

Art News Roundup: Poverty Chic Edition

In popular culture, there’s inevitably a tipping point beyond which something that was once considered to be edgy and subversive – body piercings twenty years ago, tattoos now – becomes banal. The more commonly accepted something becomes, the less it costs those who obtain it, whether monetarily or socially. In the art market however, the opposite is true. The more popular a type of … Read More Art News Roundup: Poverty Chic Edition

Why Can’t Little Johnny Draw? Art Education and the College Admissions Scandal

The fallout from the college admissions scandal in the U.S., in which some parents (including several prominent ones) allegedly paid large amounts of money to obtain entry for their children into elite universities, has largely swirled around highly-charged debates over wealth and race. Yet there’s also an interesting question to be explored with regard to what those students involved in the scandal intended to … Read More Why Can’t Little Johnny Draw? Art Education and the College Admissions Scandal

Art News Roundup: Square to Spare Edition

The Serbian artist Marina Abramović (1946-) has been the doyenne of performance art for decades. Over the years, she has managed to push a lot of people’s buttons, despite the fact that her real talent lies in self-promotion rather than in creating anything of artistic value. Case in point, a group of Polish Catholics – God bless them – has been protesting a retrospective of … Read More Art News Roundup: Square to Spare Edition