Tag: art crime

Art News Roundup: Don’t Mess With The Nonnas Edition

Tuesday was a bit busy at The Daily Planet, Gentle Reader. As a result, I didn’t get a chance to post one of my usual long-format musings as usual. So to make up for that, you’re getting an extra-long edition of weekly curated links to some of the most interesting stories from the art world over the past week. Before we plunge in however, … Read More Art News Roundup: Don’t Mess With The Nonnas Edition

Art News Roundup: Naming and Shaming Edition

Last week the Museum of Science and Industry (“MSI”) in Chicago announced a major gift from one of the city’s wealthiest residents, and the internet quickly lived up to the old adage that no good deed goes unpunished. Ken Griffin, founder and CEO of the Citadel hedge fund, has pledged $125 million to the popular Chicago institution, which preserves a vast collection of scientific … Read More Art News Roundup: Naming and Shaming Edition

Art News Roundup: Saving the Strip Mall Edition

It inevitably proves to be the case that things made by human hands, no matter how utilitarian those things are, eventually become the subject of human study. If you want to learn more about Pennsylvania Dutch barns or Japanese tatami mats, chances are you’ll find that someone, somewhere, wrote an academic paper or book on the subject that triggered further investigation and scholarship. It … Read More Art News Roundup: Saving the Strip Mall Edition

Art News Roundup: Kitchen Cimabue Edition

If you’ve not seen the story already – and it both pleases and amuses me greatly that a number of my readers immediately contacted me about it when the story broke – an extremely rare painting by one of the most important figures in art history was recently discovered hanging in a French kitchen. Cimabue (c. 1240-1302) was a Florentine artist who could be … Read More Art News Roundup: Kitchen Cimabue Edition

Art News Roundup: Viewing Verrocchio Edition

My latest for The Federalist is out today, reviewing the new exhibition “Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence”, which opens at the National Gallery of Art here in the Nation’s Capital this coming Sunday. I had the privilege of attending the press preview of the show on Tuesday, and want to encourage those of my readers who find themselves in DC during the … Read More Art News Roundup: Viewing Verrocchio Edition

Ivan To Go Home

It’s not often that I come across a story of art restitution that is more local in nature, but this one involves an auction house just down the road, more or less, and a painting that would be kind of hard to miss, given that it’s not exactly something that would fit hanging over your sofa or in the powder room. “The Secret Departure … Read More Ivan To Go Home

Art News Roundup: Delightful Discoveries Edition

After 1066, England was a rather unsettled place to live. The Normans under William the Conqueror had just invaded and killed Harold II, the last Anglo-Saxon king, at the Battle of Hastings. Harold, who had only taken the throne nine months earlier in a move whose legality is still heavily debated today by historians – as indeed is William’s claim to the throne – … Read More Art News Roundup: Delightful Discoveries Edition

Art News Roundup: Lead Balloon Edition

Amidst the furor over the causes of the fire that ravaged the Cathedral Basilica of Notre Dame de Paris back in April, and lingering questions about how the church should be rebuilt, one very important, but until now relatively under-reported, aspect of the conflagration got lost in the shuffle: burning lead. Lead, as you probably know if you’ve ever had to do repair work … Read More Art News Roundup: Lead Balloon Edition

Below The Surface: Sad Stories Of Art In Public Collections

When visiting museums, we often don’t stop to think about how these items ended up where they are. Case in point, Italy is claiming that an 11th century sacramentary, a book used by the priest for the celebration of Mass and other liturgical services, was stolen from the parish church of Santa Anna in the small town of Apiro back in 1925. After passing … Read More Below The Surface: Sad Stories Of Art In Public Collections

Art News Roundup: Seen in Savannah Edition

You’ll forgive me, gentle reader, for not posting one of my longer articles on Tuesday. I recently returned from a short break in Savannah, where I visited the Telfair Museums in order to review their current exhibition on “Rembrandt and the Jewish Experience”, examining how the Jewish community in Amsterdam influenced the art of this Christian Old Master. My musings on the show are … Read More Art News Roundup: Seen in Savannah Edition