Tag: art market

Art News Roundup: Fool Me Twice Edition

As you may have seen, gentle reader, yet another art restoration blunder in Spain has been making international headlines this week. The owner of a 19th century copy of a painting generally known as “The Immaculate Conception of El Escorial” (c. 1660) by the great Spanish Baroque artist Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1618-1682) decided that he wanted to have the object cleaned and restored. He … Read More Art News Roundup: Fool Me Twice Edition

Art News Roundup: De-Escalation Edition

It remains the case that a good eye the best tool for spotting an overlooked work of art, whether in a flea market, or in grandma’s basement or…out in a trout stream. A man who was trout fishing in a rural area near the city of Santiago de Compostela stumbled across what experts believe to be a 14th century statue of the Madonna and … Read More Art News Roundup: De-Escalation Edition

Art News Roundup: Last Call Edition

I generally try to focus on good news in these bad times, but an article about how the Wuhan Virus may seriously wound one of my preferred genres of music caught my eye, since it has broader implications. Aire Flamenco is an authoritative site for aficionados of Flamenco music and dance, and yesterday they shared the news that the association in Spain to which … Read More Art News Roundup: Last Call Edition

Art News Roundup: Springing Eternal Edition

It’s rather curious how some of the most short-lived of living things – flowers – can bring us a great deal of joy and fascination, and indeed hope, when things aren’t exactly hopeful all around us. Case in point, let’s consider one of Florentine Renaissance artist Sandro Botticelli’s (1435-1510) most famous works, “Primavera” (“Spring”) (painted sometime around 1480), which currently hangs in the Uffizi … Read More Art News Roundup: Springing Eternal Edition

Art News Roundup: Delightful Dewing Edition

My latest for The Federalist is out this morning, reviewing the stylish, albeit temporarily-shuttered exhibition, “Dewing’s Poetic World” at the Freer Gallery of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art. Thomas Wilmer Dewing (1851-1938) was a distinctive American painter who specialized in ethereal, quiet images of elegant ladies in landscapes and interiors. He was prominent at the turn of the previous century, but today … Read More Art News Roundup: Delightful Dewing Edition

Art News Roundup: Canceled Edition

This isn’t (entirely) the cancellation news roundup that you might think it is. At the outset, let’s acknowledge the obvious: it’s no surprise to learn that the Coronavirus pandemic is having a major impact on the art world. The new normal in the art news media is swiftly becoming reporting on shows and events shutting down early, or never opening in the first place. … Read More Art News Roundup: Canceled Edition

Parthexit? A Trojan Horse for Britain

Whatever you may think of Brexit, the impact of that action is already being felt in the art world – and as of yesterday, it’s taken a rather interesting turn with respect to the most famous ancient sculptures in the UK. The business impact of Britain’s departure from the European Union has, until now, been the main area of interest for those following the … Read More Parthexit? A Trojan Horse for Britain

Art News Roundup: Astrocat Edition

I had intended to do a regular post on Tuesday, Gentle Reader, but I was (happily) prevented from doing so by the arrival of my new niece. Everyone is doing well, so hopefully we can get back into the usual swing of things at this point. And to that end, one of the interesting things about studying art, and keeping up with what’s going … Read More Art News Roundup: Astrocat Edition

Art News Roundup: We Got The (News) Beat Edition

Now that things are starting to get back to normal around the Fortress of Solitude following a very enjoyable vacation, it’s time to get back to the news beat. Before we get into some art stories of interest, I want to share two links regarding the ongoing reconstruction efforts at Notre Dame de Paris. The devastating fire at the church, which consumed the roof … Read More Art News Roundup: We Got The (News) Beat Edition

What Price, Cimabue?

Readers will recall the rather stunning news I reported on a month ago, that “The Mocking of Christ”, an extremely rare panel painting by the proto-Renaissance Florentine painter Cimabue (c. 1240-1302) had been found hanging in the kitchen of a somewhat humble apartment in France. The small picture, which was once part of a larger altarpiece, was auctioned in suburban Paris this past Sunday, … Read More What Price, Cimabue?

From The Federalist: Scheming Guardians Of Taste

My latest for The Federalist is out this morning, reviewing the superb new book, “Duveen Brothers and the Market for Decorative Arts, 1880-1940,” by the Frick Collection’s Charlotte Vignon, Ph.D. While a very readable survey of the business practices of the Duveens, the most powerful art and antiques dealers in America and Europe during the late 19th and first half of the 20th centuries, … Read More From The Federalist: Scheming Guardians Of Taste

Art News Roundup: Viewing Verrocchio Edition

My latest for The Federalist is out today, reviewing the new exhibition “Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence”, which opens at the National Gallery of Art here in the Nation’s Capital this coming Sunday. I had the privilege of attending the press preview of the show on Tuesday, and want to encourage those of my readers who find themselves in DC during the … Read More Art News Roundup: Viewing Verrocchio Edition