Tag: Barcelona

A Holy Week Gift from La Sagrada Familia

Just a brief post today to let you know that there will be no art news reporting or commenting from me this week, as this is Holy Week and my thoughts are elsewhere. I hope that my readers and subscribers will understand my not wanting to post during the Paschal Triduum, in particular. That being said, I did want you to be aware of … Read More A Holy Week Gift from La Sagrada Familia

The Tale of the Typeface Thief

Like something out of an OuLiPo novel, the solution to a recent, mysterious crime involving an emblematic bit of architecture caught my eye this morning – but first, a bit of explanation is needed. In Spanish, a “granja” is a “farm”, but in Spain it’s also a type of café where dairy products are served, along with things that one might have alongside dairy … Read More The Tale of the Typeface Thief

Art News Roundup: Institutional Insanity Edition

For this week’s Art News Roundup, it’s time to settle in for a good wallow into some rather juicy new scandals from museum world, all of which seem to have hit the fan at about the same time. If you don’t have time to look into all of these stories, I want to at least encourage you to read this absolutely jaw-dropping report by … Read More Art News Roundup: Institutional Insanity Edition

Art News Roundup: Modern or New?

I was pleased to read a press announcement recently from the Meadows Museum in Dallas, which has one of the most important collections of Iberian art outside of Spain, announcing that they had acquired two new works by two important 20th century Catalan artists: Santiago Rusiñol i Prats (1861–1931) and Josep de Togores i Llach (1893-1970). This is terrific news, but I think there’s … Read More Art News Roundup: Modern or New?

Art Origins: Tales of The Four Cats

Having had a very pleasant sojourn in the motherland, Gentle Reader, I’m glad to get back to writing and reporting on areas of artistic interest which, hopefully, will encourage your curiosity and exploration in the year ahead. One of the most interesting experiences I had during my time away was a visit to the current exhibition, “Barcelona i Els Quatre Gats. Un gir cap … Read More Art Origins: Tales of The Four Cats

Art Books for Christmas: Give the Gift of Seeing

Not infrequently, I get questions about what books I can recommend for readers who are interested in learning more about art. With Christmas fast approaching, and the prospect of either finding a gift for someone else, or knowing that you’re going to receive a gift card from Aunt Hortensia that you’ll need to spend, I thought I’d put together a short list of some … Read More Art Books for Christmas: Give the Gift of Seeing

Bringing Back Baroque in Catalonia

The conventional wisdom concerning the Baroque period in Catalonia has always been, “There’s not much to look at.” For the past century or so, art historical emphasis has been placed on the area’s Romanesque, Gothic, and Early Renaissance periods of art and architecture, when the financial and naval power of the Catalans was at its height. With the economic decline that set in after … Read More Bringing Back Baroque in Catalonia

Art News Roundup: Spanish Stories

We’re back to the weekly roundup of curated news stories from the art world, and since I still have Spain on the brain – I just booked my next trip for after Christmas – today we’ll be looking at a few interesting items that touch on Iberian artists and architecture. While many artists’ homes or final resting places in Spain have become places of … Read More Art News Roundup: Spanish Stories

From The Archives: Is Gaudí Getting Closer to Sainthood?

Since I published this piece about four and a half years ago, the cause for the Beatification of architect Antoni Gaudí i Cornet (1852-1926) continues to be reviewed by the Vatican, but movement is glacially slow. Gaudí was named a “Servant of God” in 2003, a preliminary step on the road to possible sainthood, and interest in his cause has been expressed by Pope … Read More From The Archives: Is Gaudí Getting Closer to Sainthood?

From The Archives: Barcelona’s Forgotten Master

Although in the eight years (?!?!) since I wrote this piece he still hasn’t become a household name except among the cognoscenti, architect Enric Sagnier (1858-1931) remains one of the most interesting and underappreciated Catalan architects of the late 19th and early 20th century. While the attention of most visitors to Barcelona looking at architecture from this period is, understandably, drawn to the Big Three … Read More From The Archives: Barcelona’s Forgotten Master

From The Archives: The Curious Conundrum Of Catalan Vs. Castilian Coffee

Although I published this post two and a half years ago, I still periodically get comments about it, since people really care about their coffee – and they’re also, if they’ve traveled in Spain, inevitably confused as to why the coffee in Barcelona is so much better than the horrible swill that one gets in Madrid. As you read this, I’m probably enjoying the … Read More From The Archives: The Curious Conundrum Of Catalan Vs. Castilian Coffee

Art News Roundup: If You Build It Edition

I probably don’t write about architecture on here as often as I should, since even though these pages are primarily filled with stories about art exhibitions and auctions, I’m also always reading and thinking about buildings. So today, we’re going to take a look at some interesting stories from the past week or so dealing with architectural projects new, old, and revived. And ahead … Read More Art News Roundup: If You Build It Edition