Tag: museums

Art News Roundup: Naming and Shaming Edition

Last week the Museum of Science and Industry (“MSI”) in Chicago announced a major gift from one of the city’s wealthiest residents, and the internet quickly lived up to the old adage that no good deed goes unpunished. Ken Griffin, founder and CEO of the Citadel hedge fund, has pledged $125 million to the popular Chicago institution, which preserves a vast collection of scientific … Read More Art News Roundup: Naming and Shaming Edition

Art News Roundup: Mmmm’s The Word

At the moment I’m planning my travel schedule over the next six months, and am faced with the rather pleasant dilemma of having many excellent exhibitions I want to see, but a limited amount of time in which to see them. As I was commenting to my editor the other day, it’s interesting how, beginning in the 1970’s and up until a few years … Read More Art News Roundup: Mmmm’s The Word

The Witching Hour

Whether you’re talking about late-17th century Salem, or mid-20th century DC, people love a good witch hunt. In the Massachusetts colony, the fear of witchcraft was just as real to the people of that time, as the fear of insidious Communism was to people in the age of the Red Scare. Like worshiping the Devil, a practice of which Communism is merely a modern … Read More The Witching Hour

Art News Roundup: Sacking and Packing Edition

Before taking a look at some of the more interesting art stories of the past week, gentle reader, I wanted to direct your attention to an excellent lecture series on the recently-closed National Gallery of Art exhibition “Tintoretto: Artist of Renaissance Venice”, which you may recall that I reviewed for The Federalist back in April. Presented by Eric Denker, Senior Lecturer and Head of … Read More Art News Roundup: Sacking and Packing Edition

Storming The Palace: Where Does Museum Shaming Go From Here?

In case you missed it, my latest piece for The Federalist was published yesterday, in which I shared some news and thoughts about the recent trend of what I would call “museum shaming”. This is when activist groups go after museums for receiving donations from groups or individuals whom those groups find offensive in some way. Over the last couple of years, the most … Read More Storming The Palace: Where Does Museum Shaming Go From Here?

From The Archives: At Home With Sorolla and Rusiñol: Two Very Different Artists, Two Very Similar Collectors

When I published this piece about a year and a half ago, I had recently returned from seeing the newly-restored beach house of Santiago Rusiñol (1861-1931) in Sitges, and the grand, urban villa of Joaquín Sorolla (1863-1923) in Madrid. Both homes contain not only many examples of these artists’ respective work, but also their studios, as well as impressive collections of art and decorative … Read More From The Archives: At Home With Sorolla and Rusiñol: Two Very Different Artists, Two Very Similar Collectors

Spaces for Seeing: The Importance of Exhibition Design

In case you missed it, here’s a link to my latest for The Federalist, in which I review the excellent exhibition, “Empresses of China’s Forbidden City, 1644–1912” at the Smithsonian’s Freer/Sackler Gallery. If you find yourself in the Nation’s Capital between now and June 23rd, you really need to go see it. You’ll learn a great deal from the show, and it’s a good … Read More Spaces for Seeing: The Importance of Exhibition Design